Feeding Vulnerable People in Welton

We’ve recently reported on developments in feeding vulnerable people in rural Lincolnshire: the New Life Community Larder in Sleaford; the Community Larder in Horncastle; St George’s C of E Community Primary School in Gainsborough, Washingborough Academy’s distribution project; and the ChEF (Children Eat Free) Project in Wragby.

The County rural food network has further expanded to Welton, where the Lincoln Community Larder has opened its fourth delivery site at St Mary’s Church.

St Mary’s Church Welton, photo credit Push Creativity

From here, the Larder is providing basic needs for those who are Covid-vulnerable, recognising how difficult it can be for anyone who is sick and those with special needs in rural areas to gain access basic provisions and wholesome food.

The demand for their food parcels is soaring.

The Lincoln Community Larder is run entirely by volunteers, and operates three other sites at Rosemary Lane, St Giles Methodist Church and St John the Baptist, all in Lincoln. And volunteers, of course, can always do with support.

You can drop off food at St Mary’s Church Welton on Thursdays 1.30-3pm, or donate money here.

You can also contact the Larder at lincolncommunitylarder@hotmail.co.uk.

Details of more food donation drop off points here.

The All Party Parliamentary Group on the National Food Strategy

The APPG on the National Food Strategy, chaired by Jo Gideon, MP for Stoke on Trent, had its fourth meeting on  25th May to consider the way in which part 2 of the National Food Strategy might embrace the development of urban food systems, the support for rural communities, and how ‘good food’ jobs might be developed. The LFP was there.   ItContinue reading “The All Party Parliamentary Group on the National Food Strategy”

The Future of Seed

Seed sovereignty is about growers being able to produce and have control of their seeds – by saving seed from the crops they grow, selecting the strongest and most suitable seeds for breeding, and exchanging seeds freely with others. Sounds simple, right? At the moment, almost all commercial seeds are F1 hybrids. The seeds thatContinue reading “The Future of Seed”

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